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Week 4 FAAB Results

Here’s hoping everyone had a great weekend and success in bidding on their free agents. This week is going to be quick – I got backed up due to some personal matters and the holiday, plus an extra podcast with Yahoo’s Scott Pianowski today.

The thing that struck me about this week was that there were some pretty big bids on guys that weren’t on a lot of radars at the start of the season. Some were maybe thought about in deeper leagues, like Christian Walker and Hunter Dozier, but some didn’t get much look unless you went beyond 500 players. That happens with relief pitchers pretty frequently, but I’d venture to guess that it doesn’t happen as often with position players. But in 932 NFBC leagues, Ryan Cordell was drafted four times, Michael Chavis 226 times (ADP: ominously 666), Cole Tucker 111 times (ADP: 747) and Mike Tauchman 86 times (ADP: 774).

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Everyone Gets a Homer!

(Except for Eric Hosmer)

There were 41 homers hit across 15 games in Major League Baseball on Tuesday night, led by two from Yoan Moncada for the White Sox, who hit four as a team. It wasn’t the highest total for a given night, but it’s a very high total. I mused on Twitter that if your fantasy team didn’t have three homers, it probably was losing ground to the field in your league. Through 512 games this season, there have been 673 total homers, or 1.31 per game. As a point of reference, last year the league averaged 1.15 homers per game. But that’s not the most eye-opening stat. In 2017, when the juiced ball was at its juiciest, the league averaged 1.26 homers per game. In other words, we’re already on a record pace for homers, ahead of a season which was an extreme outlier in its own right.

There could be some reason to think that we haven’t yet reached the eventual level of home run production. The Rockies have only played five games in Coors Field. We’re still in April and it’s not yet warm everywhere in the country. And while there have been some huge injuries (the Yankees say hello), general attrition has yet to occur in most places, so hitters aren’t yet going up against the 17th, 18th, and 19th pitchers in an organization’s 40-man roster.

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Week 3 FAAB Results

This was the “Draft, Drop and Re-bid” Week for Touki Toussaint, wherein I made two mistakes within the course of a couple of weeks and tried to rectify them with a round of bids in the leagues where he was available. (Narrator: “He failed.”)

I took Toussaint in the 20th round of my NFBC Main Event league, only to watch in horror the next day when the Braves sent him down. I waited a week, but then had to cut him when other roster needs arose. So naturally he got called back up this week and pitched brilliantly in relief of my least favorite draft pick of the entire draft season, Sean Newcomb, who I begrudgingly took in the 22nd round. Anyone in the draft can attest that it was a grumpy pick, too. At least I’ve now cut him, but I hate wasting a pick on someone that I didn’t really want because he was a “value.” I don’t know how many more times I have to relearn that lesson, but it was at least this one more.

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Week 2 FAAB Results

I’m typically someone that bids aggressively early in the season in my free agent acquisitions. I’d rather get a bunch of players that can potentially help me for the extent of the season rather than hold out and hope that one huge name can become available when I’m holding the most FAAB money. Obviously your approach in a mixed league has to be different than in a mono-league, but the principle for me remains the same – go get your guy when you can. That’s why I was so aggressive in pursuing Chris Paddack in the FSTA League (14-team mixed), where I got him, and in Mixed LABR (15-team mixed), where I was the second-highest bidder.

But on the other hand, there’s a natural tendency to overbid early on with all this great inventory available and the need to “do something” – especially if our team is off to a slow start, or you have a slow-starting player (Ian Desmond, call for you on the purple courtesy phone). In that light, I’m not upset that I got outbid on most of my targets in my leagues, though I did have one decent-sized bid win in the NFBC Main Event. Sometimes you can make a big mistake in dropping a player that has a lot of value later in the season, too – and in a couple of my leagues I had a fear of that, having gotten rid of the obvious drops in the last two weeks.

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Week 1 FAAB Results

With four days of games in the books, we already have plenty of churn, especially if you happen to be in a league that didn’t allow for a free agent run until after the start of the season. Here are the FAAB results from my various leagues that run free agents on Sundays.

We’ll keep this quick each week – the analysis will be short and mostly self-interested, just for the sake of getting all the results out.

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FOMO Draft, The Sequel

For the second year in a row, I added a second “Beat Jeff Erickson” draft two days before Opening Day, on the NFBC’s RotoWire Online Championship platform. First of all, I love the format, but even though I need another league like USC’s Athletic Department needs another scandal or disappointing team, here I am. There’s always a subset of players I regret not getting – my “Fear of Missing Out” players – in my various drafts, so adding one more draft seems like a good solution!

Once again, I failed to draw the first or second slot, so there’s no Mookie Betts for me this year. I probably should have set my KDS to try to get at the wheel or the 11th spot, to get a better chance of drafting either Chris Sale or Jacob deGrom, both pitchers that I don’t have yet this year. But while this was a FOMO draft, I vowed not to pass up obvious value when it was presented, and one of the benefits to drafting seventh, right in the middle, is that value frequently presents itself. Your next pick is never that far away, so there’s less pressure to “jump” a player or position. Yes, of course you will miss out on some targets along the way, but rarely will you get shut out on an entire class. It’s especially handy when planning how to handle the aces at the beginning the draft.

So at 1.7, I could have taken deGrom, but once again “obvious value” was there for me in the form of J.D. Martinez. He’s my number four overall player – the best hitter not named Trout or Betts, and also behind Max Scherzer. I couldn’t pass him up just for the sake of having a different team. Luckily for me, another ace I coveted was available to me at 2.6. His identity, and my full team, after the jump and the full draft grid.

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