SS  TB
G
145
AB
525
R
82
H
146
2B
23
3B
3
HR
14
RBI
64
SB
11
CS
6
BB
65
SO
151
AVG
.278
OBP
.360
SLG
.413
OPS
.773
Stop us if you have heard this story before: prospect crushes Triple-A pitching while fans and fantasy players pine for his promotion. Player is promoted, has early success, but them goes into a huge slump. Prospect is demoted, comes back with a new mindset, and eventually reaches the levels of success everyone hoped he would immediately enjoy. Blake Snell did that in 2017 and Adames did that in 2018. He hit .224/.227/.329 with a 34% strikeout rate before he was demoted in July, but returned to hit .305/.383/.435 over the rest of the season with a 27% strikeout rate and an 11% walk rate. The power will come as he continues to physically mature as he is still just 23 years old. He will hit 20 homers in a season before he steals 10 bases, and that could happen in 2019. Adames is not going to be a superstar, but he will be a better-than-average offensive shortstop for the foreseeable future.
2B  ATL
G
157
AB
631
R
102
H
172
2B
37
3B
8
HR
19
RBI
70
SB
20
CS
5
BB
44
SO
115
AVG
.273
OBP
.324
SLG
.447
OPS
.771
The performance of young players after the break is often considered telling. If that’s the case, why is Albies getting a pass, despite a huge second half swoon? Albies posted a .834 OPS and 120 wRC+ before the break compared to a .624 OPS and 67 wRC+ after. His strikeout rate rose 1.5%, but that’s not enough to account for the disparity. The culprit was a 32-point dip in BABIP, fueled by a drop in hard-hit rate. Medium-hits balls carry the lowest BABIP and 60 percent of Albies' second-half contact was of that variety. Accordingly, his 14.7% first-half HR/FB plummeted to 5.6% post-break. Conveniently omitted is Albies isn’t just young, he did this as a 21-year-old sophomore. Albies' overall game remains impressive at his age, but he could be in danger of hitting lower in the Braves' order if he doesn’t get off to a fast start, depriving him of some counting stat volume. The power/speed combo is enticing, just beware it’s not risk-free.
OF  PHI
G
117
AB
334
R
38
H
75
2B
15
3B
1
HR
12
RBI
44
SB
4
CS
2
BB
33
SO
88
AVG
.225
OBP
.302
SLG
.383
OPS
.685
Altherr was supposed to build on his promise and take another step forward in his age-27 season. Instead, he hit poorly enough to earn a midseason demotion and finished with an ugly .181/.295/.333 line in 282 plate appearances. Contact was a big issue as he saw his strikeout rate jump to 31.9%. It’s likely that Altherr’s true talent lies somewhere between his numbers from the past two seasons. His career has now stretched over parts of five campaigns, and he’s posted a .228/.319/.417 slash line, good for a 96 wRC+ and marking him as a hitter with a low average, a bit of power, a bit of speed and slightly above-average defense. That’s a fourth or fifth outfielder profile on most teams, especially if the Phillies acquire an outfielder in free agency. If the team moves on from him and he ends up a starter on a bad team, he could be worth a late-round flier.
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